As I lay here in the sage, the sun kisses my skin. The ground smelled faintly of rain and I was happy. im a little buffalo

im a little buffalo

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elwynn-forest:

It’s Monday.

earth. Plants. Nostalgic Video Game reference. and a girl with nice legs all in one photo… Balance restored.
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

Lion: AGGGGGGGHHHHH
YOU HAVE VANQUISHED ME, MIGHTY BEAST
Cub: DAD STOP
Lion: EVERYTHING…GOING…DARK
Cub: DAD OH MY GOD
Lion: REMEMBER WHO YOU ARE…

asheathes:

WIZARDING SCHOOLS AROUND THE WORLD: JAPAN

In a secluded area of Mount Hiei, shrouded in mist, the Japanese Institute for Magical Practices spirals gracefully into the sky. The school is a series of elegant pagodas built to impossible heights with a multitude of connecting bridges crisscrossing like a bird’s nest. On the ground is an elaborate garden with a sprinkling of ponds. A kaleidoscope of fish zigzag through the water, sometimes even taking to the air like birds due to rather peculiar abilities gained over time through overexposure to magic. Students often take immense pleasure in enchanting a cherry blossom downpour to trail people who have wronged them; the charm usually remains intact for well over a week unless a teacher takes pity upon the student and dispels the spell. While they have mastered wandless magic through the use of talismans, pockets of the Japanese wizarding community have slowly begun to adopt the use of wands following its rise in popularity all over the world, although wandless magic still takes precedence, and wands are more often tucked behind their ears or used to hold up their hair than to practice magic. 

(via mordicanting)

boldempire:

Bold Empire // Business call, The Royal Exchange | ©
baiassem:

baiassem

shrinemaidens:

EAST ASIAN MYTHOLOGY MEME:

[1/8] JAPANESE GODS AND GODDESSES | UKE MOCHI

Uke Mochi [保食神] is a goddess of food in the Shinto religion of Japan.

According to the legend recounted in the Nihon shoki (“Chronicles of Japan”), the moon god, Tsukiyomi, was dispatched to earth by his sister, the sun goddess Amaterasu, to visit Ukemochi no Kami. The food goddess welcomed him by facing the land and disgorging from her mouth boiled rice, turning toward the sea and spewing out all kinds of fishes, and turning toward the land and disgorging game. She presented these foods to him at a banquet, but he was displeased at being offered the goddess’s vomit and drew his sword and killed her.

When he returned to heaven and informed his sister of what he had done, she became angry and said, “Henceforth I shall not meet you face to face,” which is said to explain why the Sun and the Moon are never seen together. Another messenger sent to the food goddess by Amaterasu found various stuffs produced from her dead body. From Uke Mochi’s head came the ox and the horse; from her forehead, millet; from her eyebrows, silkworms; from her eyes, panic grass; and from her belly, rice. Amaterasu had the food grains sown for humanity’s future use.

(via mordicanting)

aishanova:

jarofcunts:

Wow

And again and again

plz-no:

Simultaneously the worst and best movie ever made

(Source: fuckyeah-chickflicks, via savethenargles)

vikingsofberk:

stirringwind:

perfectly-modest:

Islamic headscarf 101.

this is a great post because it shows the diversity in how women dress across the Islamic world, but I want to point out the limitations of this chart is that NOT all women in all these countries wear the head covering depicted. You often see a variety of different head coverings in every country, and it’s inaccurate to think that’s the only style worn. Even amongst Muslim women, how much hair or their face they cover is VARIED within each country and even Islamic sect. While this graphic is a great resource to give you an idea of popular ways for many women in each country cover their hair/face for religious reasons, it’s not as though the variety of Islamic headcoverings is country-specific, as some people might interpret this chart to mean.
For example, the picture of “Afghanistan”- that’s a burqa. While it’s true a lot of Afghan women wear burqas, not all do. 
These are ALL photos of Afghan women voting:



(x)(x)(x)
 Or in Iran- the graphic shows a hijab. While indeed it’s quite fashionable for many women to wear the headscarf in a manner that shows some of their hair peeking out in the front like this, others ensure they don’t let a single strand show. as this photo shows: 

Others wear a chador too, which is a the long black robe you see a number of women in this photo wearing while queuing to vote- I like this picture because it shows the diversity of how Iranian women dress. 

(x)(x)
This is just so that when you see a woman wearing a headscarf that shows her face and some hair, it doesn’t mean she couldn’t be from Afghanistan. Or if you see a woman wearing a long, black chador that hides her figure, she could very well be from Iran. This goes for the other countries featured here- I’ve seen Syrian and Egyptian women wear a huge variety of head coverings for example. I’ve seen Indonesian Muslim women who don’t wear a headscarf at all. So while some head coverings are more common in each country, it’s not very uniform even within a country, and it usually comes down to each woman’s personal preference.

Some of these are absolutely beautiful

usapotterfan:

norhuu:

duckypooop:

novur:

image

always reblog because best crossover in history 

This. Always.

76,000 notes

(via savethenargles)

fuckyeahfoxfriends:

This may be the most beautiful fox I’ve ever seen

smoonie:

spokanesammirose:

Project Runway 13x08 - The Rainway

Sean Kelly #designersean

^^^ Doesn’t everybody want this?

#hungergamesstatus

(Source: vanndamp)

romansva:

" Unreal Estate " by Tim Doyle

(via simplysir)